Rest In Peace!
sketchbookjammy:

Rest In Peace Michael Jackson
August 29,1958 - June 25, 2009 
King of Pop Stays On Top
sketchbookjammy:

Like I used to say before he passed away when I used to be jamfan08 on the Mj community site or as BadEraFan on yahoo answers :King of Pop Stays On Top.
Michael Jackson, although in a different line of art, is one of my inspirations. Here is a water color/ gouache portrait I made of him recently. I truly believe no matter what field you are in you do not only have to look up to those who do what you do, but can also learn from others in other fields and use the knowledge you take from that inspiration into your own craft,

Rest In Peace!

sketchbookjammy:

Rest In Peace Michael Jackson

August 29,1958 - June 25, 2009 

King of Pop Stays On Top

sketchbookjammy:

Like I used to say before he passed away when I used to be jamfan08 on the Mj community site or as BadEraFan on yahoo answers :King of Pop Stays On Top.

Michael Jackson, although in a different line of art, is one of my inspirations. Here is a water color/ gouache portrait I made of him recently. I truly believe no matter what field you are in you do not only have to look up to those who do what you do, but can also learn from others in other fields and use the knowledge you take from that inspiration into your own craft,

Reblogged from sketchbookjammy

Anonymous asked:

Thank you so much for everything! You were such a big help. Hope you have a wonderful day!!

Glad we could help! If you have any friends taking the class next year let them know about us!

imag0ldigger asked:

What the difference between government corporations, independent executive agencies and independent regulatory agencies ???

Government Corporations

Some federal agencies resemble corporations in that they function in a businesslike manner and charge clients for their services. Government corporations differ in some important ways from private corporations. For example, government corporations do not have stockholders and do not pay dividends if they make a profit; instead, the government corporation retains all profits.

  • Examples: The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which guarantees deposits up to $250,000, and the Post Office are government corporations.

Independent executive agencies are line organizations that do not fall under the control of any one department. Presidents often like new agencies to be independent so that they have more direct control over them. Congress decides how to fit new independent executive agencies within the existing bureaucracy.

An independent regulatory agency is an agency outside of the cabinet departments that makes and enforces rules and regulations. The president nominates people to regulatory boards and agencies, and the Senate confirms them. Generally, these bureaucrats serve set terms in office and can only be removed for illegal behavior. Regulatory agencies tend to function independently from the elected parts of government, which gives them the freedom to make policy without any political interference.

  • Example: The Securities and Exchange Commission, the Federal Election Commission, and the Federal Reserve Board are all powerful independent regulatory agencies.

Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/us-government-and-politics/american-government/the-bureaucracy/section2.rhtml

Anonymous asked:

Can you please list the acts that we should know? Thank you for everything!

No problem! I have listed some for you :D

  • Civil rights Act 1875
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Civil Rights Act, Title VIII 1968
  • Civil Rights Act of 1991
  • Title IX, Higher Education Act 1972
  • America with Disabilities Act 1990
  • Pendleton Act 1883
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act 1896
  • Hatch Act 1939
  • Federal Election Campaign Acts 1971-74
  • War Powers Act 1973
  • Budget and Impound Control act 1974
  • Freedom of Information Act 1974
  • Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Bill 1985
  • Federal Corrupt Practices Act 1925
  • Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act 2002
  • Federal Register Act 1934
  • Administrative Procedure Act 1946
  • Sunshine Act 1977
  • Voting Rights Act 1965
  • Patriot Act 2001
  • War Powers Act
  • Air Quality Act 1967
  • Budget and Impoundment act 1974
  • Espionage Act 1917 and Sedition Act 1918
  • Immigration Act
  • National Voter Registration Bill
  • Personal responsibility and work opportunity reconciliation act 1996

…..well…. now that I just finished this list I just found this gem for you! It has great summaries!

http://aceqb.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/ace-lists-acts.pdf

Anonymous asked:

please explain what superdelegates are and how they give more authority to party leaders

Alright!

Super Delegates: an informal term commonly used for some of the delegates to the Democratic National Convention (most of the super delegates are seated automatically, based solely on their status as current or former party leaders and elected officials and not on primaries or caucuses).

How they give authority to party leaders: When a candidate enters a race they have to fight for the nomination. The more delegates they win, the more legitimate they appear as contenders. The candidate who appears to have the lead is called the front-runner.

More information:http://www.sparknotes.com/us-government-and-politics/american-government/the-political-process/section2.rhtml

faulisdead asked:

Do you think that you could review Everson v. Board of Education, Munm v. Illinois, Gratz v. Bollinger, Zelman v. Simons-Harris, Ashcroft v ACLU, Kelo v. The City of New London, and New Jersey v TLO??

Sure thing! here are some quick summaries from my notes!

Everson v. Board of Education (1947) : A New Jersey law that allowed reimbursements of money to parents who sent their children to school on buses operated by public transportation did not violate the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

Munn v. Illinois(1877):  States may regulate the use of private property, even by regulations and taxes.

Gratz v. Bollinger(2003): Struck down use of bonus points for race in undergrad admissions at University of Michigan; affirmative action.

Zelman v. Simons-Harris(2002): Public money can be used to send disadvantaged children to religious schools in tuition voucher programs.

Ashcroft v ACLU(2002): Struck down a federal ban on virtual child pornography.

Kelo v. The City of New London (2005): A city in Connecticut has the right to use eminent domain to seize private property to sell to private developers, if it helps the economic development of the jurisdiction.

New Jersey v. TLO (1985): A fourteen year old girl was searched in school without a warrant. The Court used a less strict standard of “reasonableness” to conclude that the search did not violate the Constitution- and abandoned the requirement on school property of “probable cause.”

Anonymous asked:

What the difference between appellate courts and district courts ??

The Difference between Trial Courts(district courts) and Appellate Courts


Trial Court:

  • Federal trial courts are called district courts.
  • Cases are heard for the first time in a trial court.
  • Cases only affect the people involved with the case.
  • The two sides present evidence and witnesses, and either a judge or a jury makes a decision based on the evidence presented.

Appellate Courts (after the trial court):

  • Federal appellate courts are called courts of appeals. Cases can be further appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • If either party disagrees with the decision in the trial court, they can appeal, asking a higher court to review the decision.
  • The outcome of appeals cases have the potential to affect large numbers of people, because these decisions are binding on district courts within the circuit.
  • No new evidence is presented, the judge(s) simply review the materials from the original trial and determine whether the lower court made the correct legal decision.

Source: http://www.civilrights.org/judiciary/courts/difference-trial-appellate-courts.html

Anonymous asked:

What is the difference between independent expenditures , 527s , PACs/SuperPACs ??

Hello!

These are all interest groups

Interest group: “Besides lobbying, interest groups also play the outside game by trying to convince ordinary citizens to apply pressure on their government representatives. Interest groups playing the outside game often rely on grassroots activism and electoral strategies to achieve their goals.”

 quote source : http://www.sparknotes.com/us-government-and-politics/american-government/interest-groups/section4.rhtml

527: an organization that is tax exempt. Advertise for or against candidates (elections)

501 (c): Individuals that are tax exempt. Includes non profits whose purpose is not political (example: america coming together, media fund, and swift boat veterans)

PAC Political Action Committee :Political arm on an interest group that is legally entitled to raise funds on an voluntary basis from members, stockholders, or employees.

Super Pac and independent expenditures are the same thing.

Independent expenditures: They can not make contributions to candidate campaigns ore parties, but can engage in unlimited political spending independently of the campaigns. Can raise money without any legal limit of donation size.